Pictured: The moment a new superyacht is VERY carefully manoeuvred along narrow Dutch canals


The incredible sight of a brand-new 310ft- (94m) long superyacht being very carefully transported through tiny quaint villages in Holland before entering the North Sea for pre-delivery trials has been captured in a set of mesmerising pictures.

Photographer and videographer Tom van Oossanen followed the vessel, called Viva, as she was guided for three days last week along narrow canals and rivers, with her eye-catching 88ft- (27m) high frame towering over houses, church spires and windmills.

Viva, built by Feadship, spans 44ft (13.4m) from port to starboard and some of the sections she squeezed through were only 46ft (14m) wide. Van Oossanen told MailOnline Travel that moving her was a ‘very delicate operation’. 

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The incredible sight of a brand-new 310ft- (94m) long superyacht being very carefully transported through tiny quaint villages in Holland before entering the North Sea for pre-delivery trials has been captured in a set of mesmerising pictures 

Photographer and videographer Tom van Oossanen followed the vessel, called Viva, as she was guided for three days through narrow canals and rivers, with her eye-catching 88ft- (27m) high frame towering over houses, church spires and windmills

Photographer and videographer Tom van Oossanen followed the vessel, called Viva, as she was guided for three days through narrow canals and rivers, with her eye-catching 88ft- (27m) high frame towering over houses, church spires and windmills

Viva, built by Feadship, spans 44ft (13.4m) from port to starboard and some of the sections she squeezed through were only 46ft (14m) wide. Van Oossanen told MailOnline Travel that moving her was a 'very delicate operation'

Viva, built by Feadship, spans 44ft (13.4m) from port to starboard and some of the sections she squeezed through were only 46ft (14m) wide. Van Oossanen told MailOnline Travel that moving her was a ‘very delicate operation’ 

Two tugboats were attached to each of the pontoons to manoeuvre the yacht, pulling and pushing from the front and rear all the way from the Feadship shipyard on Kaag Island to the North Sea via Gouda and Rotterdam

Two tugboats were attached to each of the pontoons to manoeuvre the yacht, pulling and pushing from the front and rear all the way from the Feadship shipyard on Kaag Island to the North Sea via Gouda and Rotterdam

He explained that pontoons were attached to the front and the rear of the yacht to lift her out of the water slightly, otherwise she would have been too deep for the canals.

Then two tugboats were attached to each of the pontoons to manoeuvre her, pulling and pushing from the front and rear all the way from the Feadship shipyard on Kaag Island to the North Sea via Gouda and Rotterdam.

The crew covered the sides of the ship with very thin wooden boards wrapped in fabric to protect her pearl-white finish at the tightest spots. 

Van Oossanen said that watching Viva journey through the canals was ‘quite unusual’ – she was only the fourth yacht measuring over 295ft (90m) that he had seen being transported in such a way.

He added: ‘Seeing these big yachts on transport to open sea is always very impressive and attracts loads of crowds.

‘Some boats are bigger than others, so they take more time and more people will watch. A lot of people are actually kind of used to seeing the big boats pass their houses a few times a year.’

Van Oossanen said that watching Viva journey through the canals was 'quite unusual' ¿ she was only the fourth yacht measuring over 295ft (90m) that he had seen being transported in such a way. He added: 'Seeing these big yachts on transport to open sea is always very impressive and attracts loads of crowds'

Van Oossanen said that watching Viva journey through the canals was ‘quite unusual’ – she was only the fourth yacht measuring over 295ft (90m) that he had seen being transported in such a way. He added: ‘Seeing these big yachts on transport to open sea is always very impressive and attracts loads of crowds’

To capture the colossal vessel in action, Van Oossanen used a combination of techniques. He revealed: 'Some of the images I took using a drone and I took others from buildings or from ground level to show the yacht from different perspectives'

To capture the colossal vessel in action, Van Oossanen used a combination of techniques. He revealed: ‘Some of the images I took using a drone and I took others from buildings or from ground level to show the yacht from different perspectives’ 

Feadship said the anonymous owner had 'chartered virtually every Feadship available in the global fleet over recent years' and the priority with this yacht - which was first unveiled in February - was to make it as eco-friendly as possible

Feadship said the anonymous owner had ‘chartered virtually every Feadship available in the global fleet over recent years’ and the priority with this yacht – which was first unveiled in February – was to make it as eco-friendly as possible

The vessel, also known as Project 817, features a hybrid propulsion system that allows it to travel 'a comfortable 12 knots (14mph) on diesel-electric power in the pristine areas the yacht is set to explore'

The vessel, also known as Project 817, features a hybrid propulsion system that allows it to travel ‘a comfortable 12 knots (14mph) on diesel-electric power in the pristine areas the yacht is set to explore’ 

To lessen its impact on the environment there is an onboard waste treatment plant and a system to recycle waste heat

To lessen its impact on the environment there is an onboard waste treatment plant and a system to recycle waste heat

To capture the colossal vessel in action, Van Oossanen used a combination of techniques.

He revealed: ‘Some of the images I took using a drone and I took others from buildings or from ground level to show the yacht from different perspectives.’

Feadship said the anonymous owner had ‘chartered virtually every Feadship available in the global fleet over recent years’ and the priority with this yacht – which was first unveiled in February – was to make it as eco-friendly as possible.

As a result, the vessel, also known as Project 817, features a hybrid propulsion system that allows it to travel ‘a comfortable 12 knots (14mph) on diesel-electric power in the pristine areas the yacht is set to explore’.

There is also an onboard waste treatment plant and a system to recycle waste heat.

On the design front, the owner’s ‘less is more approach’ resulted in a slick exterior fashioned by De Voogt and Azure and an ‘open beach-house-style interior’ by architecture firm Peter Marino. 

On the design front, the owner's 'less is more approach' resulted in a slick exterior fashioned by De Voogt and Azure and an 'open beach-house-style interior' by architecture firm Peter Marino

On the design front, the owner’s ‘less is more approach’ resulted in a slick exterior fashioned by De Voogt and Azure and an ‘open beach-house-style interior’ by architecture firm Peter Marino

There is no word on how many bedrooms the yacht includes or the facilities onboard. However, Van Oossanen's aerial images show that she boasts three outdoor pools and an impressive swathe of sundecks

There is no word on how many bedrooms the yacht includes or the facilities onboard. However, Van Oossanen’s aerial images show that she boasts three outdoor pools and an impressive swathe of sundecks

At the tightest spots, the crew covered the sides of the ship with very thin wooden boards wrapped in fabric to protect her pearl-white finish

At the tightest spots, the crew covered the sides of the ship with very thin wooden boards wrapped in fabric to protect her pearl-white finish

Floor-to-ceiling windows run from the bow to the stern, allowing for plenty of natural light inside the vessel

Floor-to-ceiling windows run from the bow to the stern, allowing for plenty of natural light inside the vessel

Van Oossanen said that many people living around the waterways in the Netherlands are 'used to seeing big boats pass their houses a few times a year'

Van Oossanen said that many people living around the waterways in the Netherlands are ‘used to seeing big boats pass their houses a few times a year’

There is no word on how many bedrooms the yacht includes or the facilities onboard. However, Van Oossanen’s aerial images show that the yacht boasts three outdoor pools and an impressive swathe of sundecks.

Floor-to-ceiling windows run from the bow to the stern, allowing for plenty of natural light inside the vessel.

Van Oossanen’s fascination with boats started as a child, as he grew up in Den Helder, which is the Netherlands’ main naval base.

He continued: ‘With my dad being in the navy, I was always around boats and got interested in photography at a very young age.

‘When I knew that the Netherlands was the top superyacht builder in the world I tried to find out when boats were launched or transported to take photos.

‘After 10 years of doing this as a hobby, I got offered a job at Superyacht Times, where I worked for three years and got to know the industry and build a name for myself. Now, almost three years as a freelance, things are going very well, and I am lucky enough to travel the world and work for all the world’s superyacht shipyards.’

Van Oossanen takes photos on behalf of Feadship, but on this occasion he did it ‘because I love doing what I do’. 

Van Oossanen's fascination with boats started as a child, as he grew up in Den Helder, which is the Netherlands' main naval base

Van Oossanen’s fascination with boats started as a child, as he grew up in Den Helder, which is the Netherlands’ main naval base

The superyacht photographer worked for three years at the Superyacht Times, where he got to know the industry and build a name for himself

The superyacht photographer worked for three years at the Superyacht Times, where he got to know the industry and build a name for himself

Van Oossanen takes photos on behalf of yacht builder Feadship, but on this occasion he did it 'because I love doing what I do'

Van Oossanen takes photos on behalf of yacht builder Feadship, but on this occasion he did it ‘because I love doing what I do’





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